That was yesterday 1

That was yesterday 1

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lundi 2 juin 2014

George Harrison - "Living In the Material World" (Remastered) [Full Album]







George Harrison - "Living In the Material World" (Remastered) [Full Album]

    

   

George Harrison - "Living In the Material World" (Remastered) [Full Album]
01. 00:00 "Give Me Love (Give Me Peace On Earth)"
02. 03:39 "Sue Me, Sue You Blues"
03. 08:29 "The Light That Has Lighted the World"
04. 12:01 "Don't Let Me Wait Too Long"
05. 15:00 "Who Can See It"
06. 18:53 "Living In the Material World"
07. 24:24 "The Lord Loves the One (That Loves the Lord)"
08. 29:01 "Be Here Now"
09. 33:13 "Try Some Buy Some"
10. 37:24 "The Day the World Gets 'Round"
11. 40:20 "That Is All"
12. 44:10 "Deep Blue" (Bonus Track)
13. 47:58 "Miss O' Dell (Bonus Track)
Living in the Material World is the third studio album by George Harrison, released in 1973 on the Apple Records label. As the follow-up to 1970's acclaimed All Things Must Pass and his pioneering charity project, The Concert for Bangladesh, it was among the most highly anticipated releases of that year.
Living in the Material World was certified gold by the Recording Industry Association of America just two days after release, on its way to becoming Harrison's second (and final) number 1 album in the United States, and spawned the international hit "Give Me Love (Give Me Peace on Earth)". It also topped the charts in Canada and reached number 2 in the United Kingdom, Sweden, Belgium and Australia. Remastered in 2006, Living in the Material World is notable for the uncompromising spiritual content of its songs, as well as for what are generally considered to be the finest guitar performances of Harrison's career.
Stephen Holden of Rolling Stone described the album as a "pop classic". Most contemporary reviewers consider Living in the Material World to be a worthy successor to All Things Must Pass. Author Simon Leng refers to it as a "forgotten blockbuster".